How do the metaphors used in either Shakespeare’s “Sonnet 73” or Millay’s [“What lips my lips have kissed, and where, and why”] contribute to that poem’s argument, central idea, or theme?

1) How do the metaphors used in either Shakespeare’s “Sonnet 73” or Millay’s [“What lips my lips have kissed, and where, and why”] contribute to that poem’s argument, central idea, or theme?Note: a “theme” is a text’s attitude towards its subject matter. While a poem might be about “love,” for example, its theme would be something more than one word, to suggest its attitude towards the idea of “love”: “the impossibility of love,” for instance, would work as a theme.2) How do form (rhyme scheme, enjambment, rhythm, etc.) and content (what the poem is about) reinforce one another in either Shakespeare’s “Sonnet 73” or Millay’s [“What lips my lips have kissed, and where, and why”]?3) Provide an analysis that considers Edna St. Vincent Millay’s “What lips my lips have kissed” as a response to William Shakespeare’s “That time of year thou mayst in me behold.” What critique is Millay offering of Shakespeare’s poem? If possible, discuss how the form of these poems contributes to the critique suggested by the content.4) What is the relationship between dramatic irony (the gap between what the characters in a piece of fiction believe to be true and what readers know to be true) and the tone in Kate Chopin’s “The Story of An Hour”?