Write about the covid 19 vaccine and try not to use super high level wording.

Write about the covid 19 vaccine and try not to use super high level wording.
Unit 3: Using our Research to Write a ManifestoA manifesto is a declaration of one’s beliefs or philosophy. Now that you have done research into a topic of your choosing, it is time for you to think about your own beliefs and ideas on that topic and to write them in a manifesto. What is your topic? What is an important issue or problem in the world related to your topic? Why is this issue important? What is the best way to think about this topic? What actions do you intend to take, or do you think others should take, to resolve this issue? These are the important questions you should answer in your manifesto.Your manifesto should:· Make assertive, strong declarations of your beliefs and ideas· Identify a problem in the world and offer insight and or solutions to that problem (either that you personally intend to take, or that you ask the readers to take)· Use rhetoric strategically to convince your audience that your ideas are correct and undebatable, that your cause is important and worthwhile, and that you are a trustworthy speaker· Use the structural elements appropriate to a manifesto· Use the style and tone appropriate to a manifesto· Use ideas or data from your research where necessary to support your own points· Include MLA-style citations for anyone else’s ideas, words, or data that you useFor more detail on these points, see the “Elements of a Manifesto” list, which is copied on the next page for your reference. There also links to sample manifestos on page three of this document.You will be graded on1) How detailed, thoughtful, and complete your manifesto is2) How well you organize your ideas3) How convincing your argument in favor of your own beliefs is4) How well you have adhered to the stylistic and structural expectations of the genreFull rough draft due: in your portfolio on Friday 12/18Final draft should be approximately 1000-1500 words
Here are some common genre characteristics of a manifesto.Content1. Explain a problem2. Offer clear, specific suggestions and demands for how to solve this problem3. Act as a call to action, persuading the reader not just to agree but to feel passionate about the issue4. Often include a statement or explanation framing this issue as urgent, world-changing, or central to civilization or the human condition (structurally, this is usually near the beginning)5. Use rhetoric to make their point of view seem obvious and undebatable6. Focus not just on a practical defense of their argument, but on a moral and ethical defense as well. (Frame this as an issue of good versus bad, right versus wrong)7. Find common ground with the reader to use as a basis for kinship and to promote further agreementNumbers 4-7 describe some of the important rhetorical strategies found in manifestos.Structure1. Starts with short paragraphs, often of only two or three sentences2. Paragraphs may get longer later in the work3. Often includes [numbered] lists of problems, demands, or suggested changes/solutions4. May be broken down in chapters or sections5. Each section has a clear subheadingOrganization1. Starts with a moral defense/call to action2. Next, explains a serious problem or problems3. Then, offers solutions to these problems4. Breaks down ideas into a series of clear categories or steps with a logical progressionStyle1. Fairly formal, but with conversational qualities2. May sometimes use first person plural voice (we/us) or sometimes first person singular (I/me)Tone1. Passionate2. Confident3. Determined4. Serious5. FerventAs a reference, here are links to a few famous manifestos:The Declaration of Independence: https://www.archives.gov/founding-docs/declaration-transcriptThe Communist Manifesto by Karl Marx and Frederick Engels: https://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/1848/communist-manifesto/ch01.htmA Vindication of the Rights of Woman by Mary Wollstonecraft:https://www.marxists.org/reference/archive/wollstonecraft-mary/1792/vindication-rights-woman/ch01.htmCommon Sense by Thomas Paine (Part III): https://www.ushistory.org/paine/commonsense/sense4.htm