Write an argument in which you define renewable energy, declaring with your detailed definition whether or not you think this approach is a viable alternative for the nation’s energy future.

Write an argument in which you define renewable energy, declaring with your detailed definition whether or not you think this approach is a viable alternative for the nation’s energy future. Whatever topic you choose to write on, be sure that you have a thesis statement (see thesis statement handout) that involves a claim related to an issue of definition.a. After your claim, provide a general definition of some key concept.b. Then examine your subject in light of this general definition.c. Do not forget the definition.You should use at least five sources with only one internet source allowed, excluding library database sources of which you may have as many as you like. Absolutely no Wikipedia sources permittedHow to Navigate the Library’s Databases and Noodle ToolsYou will be writing Research Essays in this course, so this page will guide you through the process of finding sources and citing them properly. For your first and third papers, I expect the bulk of your sources to come from the library’s databases or books. I only allow you one Google source on these papers. On your second paper, there is no limit on Google sources or whatever search engine you use. If you have trouble finding sources, let me know immediately. Follow these steps to get started.Go to the NVC homepage.Select Menu.Select Library.Select Databases.To go to Opposing Viewpoints in Context, select Subject List of Databases, then select Controversial Issues/Current Events, then choose the database you want. Any of the databases under this category are fine for Composition Research. You can also browse the Sciences, History, Criminal Justice/Government, Military, Social Sciences, and Newspapers/Current Events databases among others. If you are unable to access the library’s databases from home, it means you’re not in the system. Call or email the library Reference Desk at (210) 486-4513 or nvc-library@alamo.edu. You can also chat with the library by going to the library homepage.To browse e-books select Databases by Alphabet, then select “E,” and next select E-Book Academic Collection.To go to Academic Search Complete or Academic OneFile, two excellent general information databases, select Databases by Alphabet, and on the first page choose these databases.Noodle ToolsGo to the NVC homepage.Select Menu.Select Library.Select Citing SourcesSelect Noodle ToolsCreate a Personal ID if you haven’t already done so.On the left select Create a New Project.To the right of where it says Project Title, name your project.Under Citation Style, select MLA.Under Citation Level, select Advanced.Under this, select Submit.At the top of the page in the center, select Sources.To the top left of the screen, select Create New Citatation.Under “Where is it” select a Citation Type: Website, Database, etc.Since you are working with one of the library’s databases select Database, or select Print Or in Hand to cite a selection in your textbook.Under “What is it” If you are working with a journal, select Journal. If you are working with a book, select Book. If you are working with a book of articles by many authors, select Anthology/Collection.Enter the publication information that you have; if you don’t have the information don’t worry about it. This concerns the Database Accession Number and the DOI. Do paste the URL for database sources and websites.Disregard Annotation box.Select Submit.When you have your all the sources you need, select Print/Export while placing your finger on the Control button if you are in Internet Explorer.Without releasing the Control button, select Print/Export to Word.Go to your perfectly formatted works cited list on a Word document.